Local Khmer food

What is Khmer food?

Common ingredients in Khmer cuisine are similar to those found in other Southeast Asian culinary traditions – rice and sticky rice, fish sauce, palm sugar, lime, garlic, chilies, coconut milk, lemon grass, galangal, kaffir lime and shallots.

What is amok food?

Amok is Cambodia national food. It is a very popular dish in Southeast Asian countries, from Cambodia, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, and all the way to Malaysia. Amok is fish mix with coconut curry and is steamed in a banana leaf. In traditional cooking, onchoy was not use.

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KAKOR FISH -PORK SOUP

The Khmer Kroeung (spicy) and Prohok (fish paste) are rarely absent in Cambodian cuisine, especially in soup. Samlor Korkor is among most favorite Khmer soup for daily family dishes. It’s a spicy fish soup composed of many kinds of vegetables. And it’s the Khmer soup that used both Khmer Kroeung and Prohok. Samlor Korko has a long history in which it was a royal dish and later on the receipt was revealed to outside the palace and become popular by all Cambodian. ‘Samlor’ in Khmer means ‘soup’, ‘korko’ means ‘to stir or to mix’. For Samlor Korko, it’s meant ‘mix-soup’, in which it is cooked with as much as of vegetables of various kinds, depend on favorite. However, to have a nice served of Samlor Korko, it need time to prepare. As today, many kinds of ingredient for various dishes are prepared into sets and are available at the super market, included a set of Samlor Korko ingredients. If you have no time to prepare, you can get one from there in a short time. Ingredients: Thousand Vegetables, Khmer Spices. The Khmer Kroeung, about half cup - 1 tablespoon of prohok sach (fish paste which already taken out the fish bone) - 3 tablespoons of pa-ulr (rice grains fried and pounded) - Fish flesh, cleaned and sliced. The best fish for Samlor Korko is Trei Chlang, other fishes like trei andeng, trei bra, trei kae, also can use for Samlor Korko. - 200g of pork. The pork should taken the kind of where composed of flesh, oil, and skin, which in Khmer we call ‘sach bey jorn’. The pork can be minced or sliced thinly. - Vegetables: Add any vegetables as you like. The typical vegetables for Samlor Korko are pumpkin, green papaya, green banana, green jack fruit, long bean, eggplant, Khmer eggplant. And some others green leafy vegetables like slerk bas, slerk ngob, slerk ma-rum, pti, chili leaf, bitter gourd leaf. - 1 tablespoons of palm sugar - 3 tablespoons of fish sauce Preparing - First of all, put a pan on a moderate heat, add pork when the pan is hot enough and stir fry the pork, so that to get the oil from the pork. - Add the Khmer Kroeung and prohok, mix it well together. Then add the fish flesh, palm sugar and fish sauce. Stir fry it for about 3 minutes, add all the vegetables except green leafy, and pa-ulr also add in during this. Mix well everything in the pan, for about 3mn later, add boiling water into the pan to sink the vegetables. Now cook it with moderate heat until the vegetables are cooked. - Add the green leafy vegetables and adjust the taste. Bring the soup to a very boiled and Samlor Korko is ready to serve. Samlor Korko must be eaten during hot. It goes well with whom like vegetable.

PRAHOK KTIES

 Prahok Kties is a delicious staple dish of Cambodian cuisine. Prahok, which means fermented fish, is GOLD to Cambodian cuisine, and can take up different shapes of flavor, depending on the recipe. Prahok Kties is fried with pork taken from the belly sides of the hog, which accentuates the flavor, particularly with the amazing quality of pork (sakchru) that Cambodia produces. It leaves you with an amazing taste in your palates.

 MACHU KROUNG

 Machu Kroung (soup), a healthy, fulfilling, flavorful sweet and sour soup that is incredibly wholesome. The fried peanuts accentuate the soup. The lemongrass (slak krai) and the saffron truly complement each other and to top it off, the decorative local grown chili flakes (matey) make this quite an appealing site to the eye. This is in fact more towards a curry than it is the soup that most foreigners thought it to be.